Office 365

Office 365 Health Service

14 Feb: Office 365 Health Service using PowerShell

Two years ago, I wrote a PowerShell module called PSWinDocumentation.O365HealthService. The idea was simple – replicate Health Service data Microsoft offers in Office Portal so you can do with data whatever you want and display it however you like. I’ve written about it in this blog post. A few weeks back, someone reported that the module stopped working, and  I’ve confirmed it indeed no longer works! Initially, I thought that maybe some data format changed, as it changed multiple times, or perhaps the date format was wrong again, but no. Microsoft has deprecated Office 365 Service Communications API reference and instead tells us that Service Health is now only available via Microsoft Graph API. Is it only me who didn’t get the memo about this?

img_61e45a61cad4f

16 Jan: Mentioning users in notifications using PSTeams PowerShell Module

Microsoft Teams over the last few years have grown into an excellent and flexible tool for both small and big companies. Having the ability to chat with users, store files or have all sorts of data in one place makes it easy and functional. Of course, it has its fair share of issues, but it’s getting better. One of the cool features of Microsoft Teams is being able to send notifications to Microsoft Teams Channels using WebHook Notifications. In the beginning, this feature was pretty limited, but after a few years, it got much better with support for Adaptive Cards, List Cards, Hero Cards, Thumbnail Cards, and Office 365 Connector Card.

Office 365 Org Settings

26 Sep: Configuring Office 365 settings using PowerShell – The non-supported way

Office 365 is a huge beast. It has so many services that it’s hard to track all of them. It’s even harder if you want to manage Office 365 using PowerShell. Microsoft makes many different PowerShell modules available for you, such as AzureAD, AzureADPreview, ExchangeOnline, MicrosoftTeams, and recently, Microsoft.Graph. But even with so many different modules, there are still tasks that Microsoft won’t let you do from PowerShell. But it doesn’t mean that it’s not possible to do it. I’ve spent some time tracking how Microsoft does things while you click thru the interface and created an O365Essentials PowerShell module that can do it in an automated way.

Sending as Alias in Office 365

20 Apr: Sending email as an alias (proxy address) with Office 365

Sending emails in Microsoft Exchange world using an alias for an account has always been a pain. It required working with workarounds such as setting up Shared Mailbox or Distribution Groups and using SendAs permissions. For years admins around the world were asking Microsoft to change this, and finally, in April 2021, they did! It’s a new feature of Office 365, and it requires action from Office 365 Administrator.

img_5fd128bf1d705

03 Jan: Creating Office 365 Migration Diagram with PowerShell

A few weeks ago, I posted a concept migration diagram for Office 365 to Twitter and Facebook. Today I thought I would show you how you can do it yourself using PowerShell and PSWriteHTML PowerShell module. When I started working on this, I’ve thought I want to create before and after infrastructure to see how it will look when migration ends. I’ve initially planned to assign myself an Office 365 Visio Plan 2 license and do something manually, thinking it may be just much easier. Unfortunately for me, there were no free Visio licenses in my tenant, and my laziness took over, so I’ve decided to give it a go using PowerShell only.

PowerShellBlack

06 Dec: Remove-Item : Access to the cloud file is denied while deleting files from OneDrive

I like OneDrive. It allows me to keep my data secure and always synchronized. If things go wrong, I can always get it back. I use it for almost everything. Even for my PowerShell projects, which are committed to GitHub, so in theory, I shouldn’t need that. But every once in a while, I make some stupid mistake and delete a file that has yet not been committed to GitHub, and that’s where the OneDrive comes in handy. Quick restore, and we’re back. Unfortunately, sometimes things aren’t as I would expect them to work. For example, let’s have a look at this nice list of markdown files that are documentation for my module called GPOZaurr.

ExpenseApproval

09 Nov: Introducing PSTeams 2.0 – Support for Adaptive Cards, Hero Cards, List Cards and Thumbnail Cards

PSTeams PowerShell module has been on the market for a while now. It supports sending notifications to Microsoft Teams channels via Incoming WebHooks. You could send a pretty message to the team’s channel with just a few lines of code. With PSTeams 2.0, support for Adaptive Cards, Hero Cards, List Cards, and Thumbnail Cards was added.

img_5f2886c574e65

04 Aug: Mailozaurr – New mail toolkit (SMTP, IMAP, POP3) with support for oAuth 2.0 and GraphApi for PowerShell

Today, I’m introducing a new PowerShell module called Mailozaurr. It’s a module that aims to deliver functionality around Email for multiple use cases. I’ve started it since native SMTP cmdlet Send-MailMessage is obsolete,  and I thought it would be good to write a replacement that adds more features over it as things around us are changing rapidly.

img_5e89cc6b4b3e9

07 Apr: Office 365 – Limiting license to minimum apps required

Office 365 has a lot of options and applications to choose from. Enabling one E1, E3, or any other license gives the user a lot of features, including Exchange, SharePoint, and Teams. But what if you want to make sure that the user can access only Microsoft Teams? By default, you can do it manually during the assignment of the license. Simply choose only Apps you want to assign to a user.