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Instant Replication between Active Directory sites with PowerShell

In Active Directory when you change something, it's replicated to other Domain Controllers regularly. It's a standard procedure that happens automatically in the background for you. It's a handy feature because you can have multiple DC's all over the world and have your users data in sync. You can change almost anything on DC nearest to you and be sure it will be the same value all over the place. But is it always the same? Well, it should be unless it isn't. Today I was given a new migration from  Exchange to Office 365. I started with ADConnect installation and wanted to make sure that UserPrincipalNames have all UPNSuffixes in place.

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Getting Bitlocker and LAPS summary report with PowerShell

Having Bitlocker and LAPS in modern Active Directory is a must. But just because you enable GPO and have a process that should say Bitlocker and LAPS are enabled doesn't mean much. Now and then you should verify things yourself. One of the Facebook users on PowerShell group just had this idea of exporting Bitlocker keys and then giving that list to his colleagues for manual verification. He wanted to do it half PowerShell and half manually. While the idea was great, why not take full advantage of PowerShell and have a helpful report with all the necessary information?

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Fixing Active Directory PasswordNotRequired with PowerShell

There was I, deploying PSPasswordExpiryNotifications for one of my Clients when I started getting complaints that some users are not getting their Password Expiry Notifications. Well, that's a new one. I've tested this script multiple times, and it worked just fine. So I dive into the details of my script to see what I did in there (I don't even remember anymore - it just works) to find out this little line:

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The only PowerShell Command you will ever need to find out who did what in Active Directory

While the title of this blog may be a bit exaggeration, the command I'm trying to show here does it's best to deliver on the promise. What you're about to witness here is something I've worked on for a while now, and it meets my basic needs. If you don't have SIEM product or products that monitor who does what in Active Directory this command makes it very easy, even for people who don't have much experience in reading Event Logs. If you'd like to learn about working with Windows Event Logs here's a great article I wrote recently - PowerShell - Everything you wanted to know about Event Logs and then some.

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Active Directory – The directory service was unable to allocate a relative identifier

I've been testing Disaster Recovery scenario restoring Active Directory. One of the servers was restored, and it worked for a moment after restore. If you can regain your Primary DC, it's best to do so. If you can't, a standard thing to do during DR is to move all FSMO roles to the restored server so that it can become a master server. You can find out your FSMO holders by using those commands below:

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How to find different server types in Active Directory with PowerShell

Working as a freelancer is a great thing if you can handle it. Each day, each week something new happens and a new problem shows up on my doorstep. It also means it's almost never boring at your job and you get to play with new stuff. But there's one drawback to this. You're often thrown at the problem, told to fix it but often that's about as much information as you get. It wasn't very different today. I was told to switch Office 365 from ADFS to Password Synchronization. While reasons for this are not really important, the important question here is what is the name of AD Connect server that's responsible for this configuration?

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PSWinDocumentation – Audit Active Directory Passwords

If you're paying attention to what's happening around the world now you probably know Have I Been Pwned service by now. You probably know that it has huge lists of hashes of passwords that leaked out over the years from different services (LinkedIn, Adobe, and so on). This means those passwords are now in possession of good guys, but also bad guys. With Active Directory being often a central place to store your password that allows you to access your Office 365 account, ADFS, Microsoft Exchange it's important that your AD passwords is both secure and safe. Bad guys may want to try and access your email accounts or other data that's available online. And having a list of passwords you or other people may have used before doesn't help you in protecting your own data.

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